Do You Need Electrical Code Corrections?

At Green Key Electrical, our electricians are trained to identify and correct a number of NEC code violations for your safety and protection of property.

Are you a homeowner selling a home? planning on buying a home? a property manager or a realtor wanting to get your property up to code?

Give us a call at 1-888-WATTS 4 U and we’ll get it taken care of fast with quality work at an affordable price…

If you’re planning on purchasing a home, there’s good reason to ensure that any major work that has been done has been  completed up to the local code requirements. We strongly recommend contacting the municipality for permits obtained for the home you’re interested in, also getting an inspection to check the overall condition of your electrical system and the quality the work  is a good idea…

  • Safety Violations
  • Overloaded Circuits
  • Incorrect Sized Wiring
  • Poor Craftmanship
  • Connections
  • Faulty Electrical Panels
  • Unpermitted Work
  • GFCI/AFCI Requirements
  • Overloaded Circuits
  • Unfinished Electrical Projects
  • Damaged Cables

Permit regulations vary by city and state but most use the NEC, CEC or parts taken from both and add their own city and state codes. Building codes are required for most professional trades including plumbing, electrical, heating and more, these codes are for your safety and the protection of your property. While a little home improvement done by the homeowner or with the help of a neighbor for a cold six pack might be a great way to cut cost, be careful you don’t put yourself or your family in a dangerous situation or end up having to do it over. No matter how many YouTube videos you watch, if you’re uncertain on the correct way to do it safely, then hire a licensed professional, pull a permit and get it inspected. It will cost a little more, but well worth the extra cost of getting caught doing the work without a permit, or far worse, doing it wrong and ending up with an unsafe installation.

Non-Compliant Panel Installation

This panel was put in by an unlicensed electrician that decided to extend the feeder wires after installing the panel to high to connect them properly. This panel was put in by an unlicensed electrician that decided to extend the feeder wires after installing the panel to high to connect them properly. (note the arching on the side of the panel)

An employee of the power company discovered the illegal splices while getting a meter reading. He then informed the homeowner that he had to report his findings to the city inspector as an unpermitted install which cost the homeowner much more to correct the problem and get it permitted than it would of to do it right the first time!!

Code Correction

Customer called Green Key Electrical and explained the situation. After the permit was pulled through the city, we removed the splices and additional wire extensions.  Then with a little modification, we installed a busbar extension on each of the two existing busbars of the panel which gave us enough length of the underground feeder wires to connect the feeders directly into the lugs…

This is the second time we had Jerry do work for us. The first time was way beyond expectations, I called at 1:30 AM and was expecting to get voicemail but Jerry answered. Long story short, he was at our house at 2:15 AM, I’m not kidding 2:15 AM. He identified the problem right away, secured the problem, ordered the parts and had everything fixed a couple of days later.

This time we had a problem with our electrical panel and was told by the electric company that it could be very expensive to fix. I called Jerry and he came on the same day and immediately found a solution to the problem that cost one tenth of what we were expecting.

If you’re looking for great service at an ultra fair price Jerry’s your guy.

Frank Raimond

Flying Splices are not rare when it comes to code corrections…

Flying splices are open wire connections that are not contained within a junction box. Even when done carefully, flying splices present a potential electrical hazard and are not acceptable and against code according to building and safety codes. These are usually done by a handyman or unlicensed electrician to save the time it takes to do it right by pulling back the circuit wiring to the nearest jbox or adding a jbox to contain the wire connections…

Flying splices may become loose over time, not being contained in a jbox, wires either nicked or cut when they were stripped could present an open path for electrical arcs. For these reasons and many more, splices are required by code to be contained within a junction box.

The junction box provides a barrier between the wire ends and any other surface in the event of loose connections and possible arching in your wall cavities or  against walls, beams, etc. when found it is a fairly easy code correction and one that brings a home “up to code” and ensures the safety of the electrical system and the protect the property.

All circuit connections are to be contained in an accessible jbox for the installation to be “up to code”. When troubleshooting a circuit, flying spices can also cost a lot of time (which translates to money) just trying to locate the fault in the circuit wiring when it’s buried in the wall cavity, not to mention a few holes are required to find the slices which will need to be patched and painted…

These Flying splices were found inside the wall cavity and are not only against code but are also a fire hazard. The fact being the wire connections not being in a jbox and hanging in the wall cavity is a major concern if the wire connections become loose and start aching. When this happens, it is impossible to see and sometimes the faulty work is only discovered after a fire and it’s too late…

These Flying splices were found inside the wall cavity of a kitchen remodel. They look a little cleaner than the flying splices in the picture on the left but still with the wire connections not being in a jbox and just hanging in the wall cavity if the wire connections become loose and start aching it is impossible to see and in many cases discovered after a fire has occurred…

These Flying splices are connected to a 240V dryer receptacle and especially dangerous for several reasons. The first being, the circuit wiring is AWG #14/2 Romex. This circuit wiring is good for up to 15A and when connected to a 30A breaker it will burn long before the breaker trips when overloaded. This and the fact of the wire connections not being in a jbox and hanging in the wall cavity plus the wiring being supported by a metal screw making this installation very unsafe …

UNDERSIZED WIRE

This receptacle was wired by a homeowner using speaker wire which is good for about 10A. The receptacle is connected to a 20A breaker at the panel, and although it works, it’s only a matter of time before the wire burns or a fire is started…

Another example of undersized wiring which is found quite frequently is when a circuit breaker keeps tripping from the breaker being overloaded. A lot of times a handyman or unlicensed electrician will install a bigger breaker instead of adding a circuit or remove some of the loads connected to the breaker.

Another example of undersized wiring which is found quite frequently is when a circuit breaker keeps tripping from the breaker being overloaded. A lot of times a handyman or unlicensed electrician will install a bigger breaker instead of adding a circuit or remove some of the loads connected to the breaker.

Let’s say you have a 15A breaker that keeps tripping and this breaker controls various lighting but also has some receptacles connected to it. You call for a repairman to come over and fix the problem, they take a look at your panel, remove the 15A and install a bigger breaker in its place. By doing this the homeowner naturally thinks the circuit is now capable of handling a bigger load and won’t trip as much because of the new 20A or bigger breaker installed.

Well, the homeowner is right in the way that the bigger breaker size won’t trip at the 15A it was tripping at before and now won’t trip until it reaches 20A or more depending on what size was installed. The problem is the wiring is still only good for up to 15A and it will burn before the bigger breaker trips, resulting in rewiring the whole circuit or possibly starting a fire…

 

Exposed Wire

Exposed circuit wiring is found in garages, porches and a number of places. NEC Section 336-6(b) requires that the cable is protected. This protection can be by installing it in conduit, electrical metallic tubing (EMT), Schedule 80 PVC, pipe, guard strips, listed surface metal or nonmetallic raceways, or by any other means that will provide suitable protection for the cable.

Is it acceptable to install nonmetallic sheathed cable (NM) exposed on a wall or in an attic, a basement, or a residential garage with restrictions found in the NEC.

Buried Jbox

A buried jbox or pull box inside of a wall cavity or ceiling cavity is not code compliant. A jbox or pull box must be readily accessible to be “up to code”. When this occurs the circuit should be pulled back to the nearest jbox and then reran to the required location…

 ?????

Although this is very creative, I have no idea why someone would do this! It probably took longer to do it this way than it would have to do it right, plus it looks very unsafe and definitely not code compliant..

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