A few substandard installations…

This started out as a recessed light and presto now it’s a hanging light at a minimum cost, probably just mounted strait to the ceiling with a couple anchor screws…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I guess duct tape can fix about anything…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This was a first, instead of using a recessed can to hold the fixture and trim he decided to save a few bucks and used a coffee can, probably not a very safe alternative…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This homeowner wanted more light and instead of replacing the fixture and to save same to money and thought this was a good plan, it probably cost more to do it this way and not a very nice looking install…

 

 

 

 

 

 

These people were having problems with the heater constantly running, looks like someone thought this was a good place to save their quarters for a rainy day…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What’s in your walls?

This is an exterior installation and should be a GFCI receptacle, judging be the common connection it had come loose and started arching and ended up burning the receptacle. If you hear buzzing or a crackling sound at an outlet location be sure to have it checked out to avoid these results…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In this picture the panel looks like it was supported by the siding of a manufactured home, needless to say a better support system should have been used… This is only one reason why permits should be pulled and inspected by the city to insure a safe and code compliant installation. Another reason is when the owner decides to sell and the city discovers no permits were pulled this would have had to be removed and redone with permits before the sale could go through!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

These are samples of “Flying Splices” All the connections should be in a jbox and accessible if when connected in this manner is a problem occurs there is know way of locating them without tearing open the walls to trace, this is definitely not up to code and if short out or become loose could easily start a fire…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This receptacle has been added to a 20A circuit with speaker wire witch is only good for approximately 10A and is a fire waiting to happen…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In this picture the hot leg of the circuit has been screwed into the service feeder wires, this is a sure way to start a fire due to the fact it is not connected to a breaker and when overloaded it will burn the wire instead of tripping a breaker and leaving an unsafe open hot wire somewhere in the circuit, hopefully not inside the walls or near flammable materials such as installation…

 

 

 

 

 

 

This circuit has been added using an extension cord fed directly into the panel. Although this works it’s very dangerous as the size of the wire is not sized correctly and connected by stabbing the circuit wiring into the female end of the extension cord without a box creating flying splices in the attic…This is not safe  and could easily start a fire if the circuit is overloaded…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rodents like the outer cover of older romex wiring, This one probably didn’t know it would be his last meal while shorting the circuit and leaving exposed wiring inside the walls…

 

 

 

It Pays to have the right equipment for the job…

These guys are pushing the limit and if unlicensed and uninsured the homeowner is responsible for any accidents so beware when trying to save a buck and not hiring a professional…

 

Just for fun electrical test,

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